Red Clover

Could a pretty purple flower be the remedy you’ve been looking for to treat hot flushes, night sweats, and bone health?

According to the many women who take red clover as a menopause treatment, it could help. Red clover is a common herbal treatment for the menopause, as it contains a substance called isoflavons, which are phytoestrogens – a compound similar to estrogen. That is, red clover may act like estrogen in your body, so consuming it could be a natural replacement for estrogen lost during the menopause. It’s one of the most popular herbal remedies for menopause, but is it just a fad?

…red clover is said to be beneficial for a number of menopausal symptoms including hot flushes,

Well, maybe. Theoretically, red clover is said to be beneficial for a number of menopausal symptoms including hot flushes, night sweats, bone health, heart health, skin inflammation, and respiratory infection, as well as breast pain, indigestion, sexually transmitted infections, and hair loss. This is why if you pop into your local Boots or Holland and Barrett, you’ll find many menopause remedy tablets including red clover as a main ingredient. However, most studies on red clover have shown that it’s fairly ineffective at treating these symptoms. Of course, the occasional study shows positive results – such as a small 2005 study that found that red clover significantly decreased the rate of menopause symptoms – which is why it’s still sold today as a menopausal remedy. Yet, these kinds of results are not very common.

…it’s found to be a relatively safe herbal treatment, so it doesn’t hurt to try.

Ultimately, the bad news is that clover isn’t clearly effective for menopausal symptom relief. The good news, however, is that there aren’t any serious side effects that have been found. While it’s recommended not to take if you’re taking forms of estrogen already (birth control or HRT), nor is it recommended to take for long periods of time, it’s found to be a relatively safe herbal treatment, so it doesn’t hurt to try. Additionally, it’s not vastly expensive. A month-long supply (30 tablets at 40mg per tablet, taking one tablet a day with plenty of liquids) will cost you roughly around £16. It’s possible that red clover doesn’t work for most women, but it could work for some (or of course, it could be a placebo effect) so if you wanted to try to test it for yourself, it doesn’t hurt!

Overall, red clover is like most herbal treatments in that there is a lack of evidence regarding effectiveness. In fact, the evidence in favor of red clover is fairly thin, especially compared to other herbal remedies like black cohosh which shows slightly more positive finding (but also slightly higher risks). Again, it’s considered to be safe and relatively inexpensive, so you can be the judge! You might just get the luck of the clover.

RELATED ARTICLE: BLACK COHOSH


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